Industries

warehousing

Apprenticeships, Degree Apprenticeships and Work Experience

Warehousing


If you enjoy utilising creative approaches to problem solving and want to work in a dynamic and fast-paced environment, working in the warehousing industry may be for you. Warehouse workers do the tricky behind the scenes stuff that keeps our society running – from pharmaceuticals to hazardous materials, this is a highly important sector.

Industry Summary

In reality, warehouse employees are incredibly important in our modern consumerist society. They are the ones that track down, handle, package and ship all of our much in demand goods – without these people doing the hard work, we wouldn’t have the latest smart phone or designer sports shoe at our disposal.

Working in the warehouse industry may be an excellent opportunity for those who don’t want the deskbound lifestyle of an office job. A warehousing role often involves a lot of physical labour; that means you can cut down on the pricey gym membership or the long runs on the weekend, your job should give you all the physical exercise you need to keep healthy. Flexibility is also a bonus when it comes to a warehousing job – many employers offer variable schedules, meaning you can work times that are generally conducive for your other commitments and interests.

Of course, this does come with the added bonus of normally being able to operate a fork lift.

If you would like to find out how warehousing is part of the greater transport logistics sector, why not check out our industry page for that topic?

 

What options can I take for a career in warehousing?

 

Work Experience

You may think it is hard to find warehousing work experience, but the good news is that there are many ways to enter the sector even with little or no experience. Many companies are willing to hire people for part-time positions or on a short-term basis; having evidence of this will prove to employers that you have the skills to be an effective employee. However, most employers are happy to hire those with a clear enthusiasm for the work and train them on the job – you may not want to work in the ‘lower’ positions, but they may pave your way to succeed once you’ve gained some more experience in your role.

Unsure about what a work placement could involve? You should’ve asked!

                         

Apprenticeships

An apprenticeship is an excellent way to pursue a career in the warehousing industry. You’ll have the opportunity to work with an employer and be given real levels of responsibility, learning the skills of the trade alongside your experienced colleagues who can help provide guidance. You’ll be paid a salary for your work and also have the chance to study towards the qualifications that relate directly to your role.

  • Level 2 – Supply Chain Warehouse Operative

Want to know what apprenticeships are all about? We have you covered!

 

University

Although you do not need a degree to gain a career in the warehousing industry, some employers may expect this as a qualification to enter into the managerial aspects of the business. At university, you’ll be able to spend time learning the theoretical and academic knowledge behind the sector, information that you’ll be able to apply to your role once you graduate. If you know what you’d like to do, it’s possible to choose your modules to reflect your area of interest or specialise to aid a potential career choice.

Want to find out what University could offer you? We have your back!

 

Graduate Jobs

There are many opportunities open to graduates in the warehousing industry – these tend to be in positions of management or logistics and are normally open to candidates of any degree background. However, some employers are likely to request recruits to have a degree qualification in a related field, such as business management or transport logistics. Some larger companies also offer graduate schemes. These are created to provide structured training to new employees and properly prepare them for their future career in warehousing.

Want to know what graduate jobs are all about? We can help!

 

Other routes

Many roles in the warehousing industry do not require you to have any set work experience and qualifications, and so are open to people of all backgrounds. This is a great sector for those who wish to enter the workplace straight from school or as a career change. It’s very easy to start in an organisation and work your way up through the ranks as you impress your employers with your enthusiasm and dedication to the job.

Start your search for your career in warehousing

Career Progression, Discover Your Future

Managers and directors in storage and warehousing

Work Description

Managers and directors in storage and warehousing plan, organise, direct and co-ordinate the activities and resources necessary for the safe and efficient receipt, storage and warehousing of goods and for the maintenance of stocks at an optimal level.

Qualification

Candidates are recruited with a variety of academic qualifications and/or with relevant experience. Entrants to management trainee schemes offered by larger companies will require GCSEs/S grades, A levels/H grades, a degree or other equivalent qualifications. Off- and on-the-job training is provided. Professional and vocational qualifications covering a number of areas including supply chain and operations management are available at NVQ/SVQ Levels 2, 3, 4 and 5.

Job Tasks

liaises with production, maintenance, sales and other departments to determine the materials and other items required for current and future production schedules and sales commitments; reviews, develops and implements stock control, handling and distribution policies to maximise use of space, money, labour and other resources; advises purchasing department on type, quality and quantity of goods required and dates by which they must be available; prepares reports on expenditure and advises on materials and parts standardisation, future stores and stock control policies; decides on storage conditions for particular items, allocates warehouse space and arranges for regular stock inspections to detect deterioration or damage.

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Estimated Pay

Information on weekly pay (average, median and decile) is taken from a combination of two sources: the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE); and the Labour Force Survey (LFS) (both conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS)). ASHE is widely regarded as the most reliable source of information on Pay and Hours, however it does not include information on pay by qualification as well as some other characteristics (such as self-employment).

Unemployment Data

The level and rate of UK unemployment for this career path measured by the Labour Force Survey (LFS) as a percentage, using the International Labour Organisation's definition of unemployment.

Projected Employment Levels

Estimated Hours

Fork-lift truck drivers

Work Description

Fork-lift truck drivers operate fork-lift trucks in factories, warehouses, storerooms and other areas to transfer goods and materials.

Qualification

There are no formal academic entry requirements. Training is through accredited training schemes provided in-house or by manufacturers. NVQs/SVQs in Lift Truck Operations are available at Level 2.

Job Tasks

operates controls to pick up load on forks; drives truck to unloading point and lowers forks to correct position on stack or ground; ensures that truck is connected to charger or is correctly refuelled for use; keeps records of work undertaken; cleans, oils and greases machine.

Related Jobs

Driver, car, scale Driver, car, weigh Driver, FLT Driver, fork-lift Driver, hyster Driver, internal Driver, lift, fork Driver, loader, side Driver, stacker Driver, transport Driver, truck, clamp Driver, truck, electric Driver, truck, fork Driver, truck, fork-lift Driver, truck, lift, fork Driver, truck, power Driver, truck, stacker Driver, truck, works Driver, truck Driver Hyster Lifter, fork Operator, fork-lift Operator, lift, fork Operator, loader, side Operator, truck, fork Operator, truck, forklift Operator, truck, lift, fork Stacker-driver 

Estimated Pay

Information on weekly pay (average, median and decile) is taken from a combination of two sources: the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE); and the Labour Force Survey (LFS) (both conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS)). ASHE is widely regarded as the most reliable source of information on Pay and Hours, however it does not include information on pay by qualification as well as some other characteristics (such as self-employment).

Unemployment Data

The level and rate of UK unemployment for this career path measured by the Labour Force Survey (LFS) as a percentage, using the International Labour Organisation's definition of unemployment.

Projected Employment Levels

Estimated Hours

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